New Transparency List For Generics And A Victory In Court

On February 16, 2015 the Italian Medicines Agency (“AIFA”) has published the 2015 update to the so called “transparency list” (lista di trasparenza), i.e., a list of generic drugs authorized in Italy, along with their market price.

Following a number of changes in the legislation governing generics in the past few years, the National Health Service currently only reimburses the cost of the less expensive generic on the market. In fact, Section 7 of Law Decree 347/2001 sets forth the medicines having the same active ingredients composition, pharmaceutical form, way of administration, release modalities, number of tablets and dosage, are reimbursed by the National Health Service up to the price of the less expensive product on the market. The transparency list serves as a tool for reimbursement purposes: if the patient chooses to buy a branded product or a more expensive generic, the patient will need to cover the difference in price.

The publication of the transparency list comes shortly after a recent decision of the highest Italian administrative court, which stroke down past practices of AIFA on the reimbursement of new generics. In this case, the generic drug company EG S.p.A. claimed that AIFA issued a marketing authorization for gabapentin (a generic drug approved in a different EU member state) but unduly refused to recognize any reimbursement. The per-tablet dosage of the generic drug was in fact different from the branded product and other generics already included in the transparency list: therefore, according to AIFA, reimbursement was not warranted by Section 7 of Law Decree 347/2001. AIFA also argued that the new dosage, higher than other reimbursed products, entailed risks for the patients’ safety, as they would have to apportion the right dosage themselves (e.g., to split the drug tablets in half). The administrative court stated that such risk was ungrounded and had no impact on the reimbursement of the drug: if at all, it should have prevented AIFA from issuing a marketing authorization in the first place. Furthermore, the court stated that the National Health Service may reimburse a generic even if not included in the transparency list, striking down AIFA’s argument that dosages already reimbursed by the National Health Service sufficiently covered the needs of the patients, as such criterion was not set forth in applicable legislation.

The court decision comes as the latest victory for generics on the Italian market, adding to several regulatory and legislative changes prompted by budged restraints in the past few years, causing generics to continue gaining strength. In the meantime, proposed new legislation on the sale of generics outside of authorized pharmacies is stirring public debate.

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