Monthly Archives: February 2018

New Rules on Continuing Medical Education

The rules on continuing medical education (“CME”) have changed since a new agreement between the Italian government, the Italian Regions and the autonomous provinces of Trento and Bolzano has come into force on February 2, 2018. You may find the new agreement here or here (only in Italian, sorry).

The agreement is an “upgraded version” of the previous principles, which remain largely unchanged, but are now better defined, stricter and hopefully more effective.

  • THE RIGHT TO CME. Health care professionals (“HCPs”) have the right to obtaining CME and regulators will need to remove impediments in order to allow the exercise of such right.
  • ACCREDITATION OF PROVIDERS. As before, providers of CME need to be accredited, but accreditation will be subject to stricter rules, which particularly focus on avoiding any conflicts of interest. Providers will also need to adopt an internal regulation setting forth how to prevent and exclude (even potential) conflicts of interest.
  • SPONSORSHIP OF EVENTS. Sponsorship of CME events will be possible by private companies, provided that the principles of transparency, objectivity, impartiality and independence are complied with. No advertisement of medicinal products or medical devices can be carried out during the CME event, but only before, after and outside the event. No direct payments or reimbursements are allowed to speakers or moderators of the CME events.
  • NO ACCESS TO PERSONAL DATA OF HCPs. On the data protection front, note that sponsors of CME cannot have access to lists and addresses of participants, speakers or moderators.
  • SPONSORSHIP OF HCPs. Lastly, HCPs may be sponsored by commercial firms operating in the health industry, but cannot fulfil more than one third of their CME requirement through such sponsorship. This is bound to change how CME has been handled before, forcing HCPs to bear the cost of at least two thirds of their CME requirements.

Have a great weekend!

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Vaccines: the Italian Constitutional Court rules in favor of mandatory vaccination imposed by national law

The polarized debate over vaccines sees the Italian Constitutional Court taking an important step into the discussion, shortly before the last notable rebellion against compulsory vaccination in Italy. Only a few days ago, in fact, the Mayor of Rome, Ms. Raggi (together with the members her Council, unanimously), approved a motion contradicting the mandatory nature of the 10 (originally 12) vaccinations, made compulsory for school-age children by a recently enacted Italian law. Nevertheless, the “rebels” in Rome probably did not take into the appropriate account the decision of the Italian Constitutional Court, which ruled in favor of the vaccines imposition under Italian law.

The Court – in deciding a constitutional challenge brought by the Veneto Region against the imposition of vaccination by the State – explains its views in a straightforward way.

First of all, the Court makes it very clear that, when it comes to vaccines, fundamental health care rights are involved and, to such regard, no difference is constitutionally acceptable between different areas of the Italian territory. In other words, when a healthcare measure is imposed by a national law in the public interest, Regions and local authorities do not have a say about it.

Furthermore, and most importantly, the Court clarifies that – also taking into account the worrisome drop in vaccination rates in recent years – the choice of tightening up legislation to compel vaccinations is not unreasonable.

True, persuasive techniques – such as the ones that Veneto Region would like to implement – can, ideally, represent a better option, but only when the herd immunity result is somehow guaranteed. Conversely, when vaccination rates drop, obligations and sanctions by law – as the California example showed – are not only reasonable (and constitutional), but much more effective.

Well, when the going gets tough, the law gets going. And that’s reasonable, Italian Constitutional Court says.