All posts by Paola Sangiovanni

About Paola Sangiovanni

Partner of GITTI and Partners. Seasoned transactional and regulatory legal counsel with a thorough understanding of the life sciences industry.

Much HEALTH and happy holidays to you all!

As the second year of the pandemic draws to a close, it is easy to find reasons to complain: they sometimes come conveniently arranged in alphabetical order (Delta, Omicron…)!

But we also want to remember the many things we are grateful for: vaccines, for example, but especially your friendship and support in 2021.

May 2022 be a good year to you and your loved ones. May you face 2022 armed with hope, courage, empathy, resilience and joy.

The Gitti and Partners life sciences team.

U.S. vs Italy Healthcare Fraud Laws

I am happy to announce that the article that Marc Raspanti and Pamela Coyle Brecht of Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP and I have authored has been published in Compliance Today: https://bit.ly/3Cs9HOI , a publication of the Health Care Compliance Association.
This is Part 1 of a three-part series discussing the similarities and differences between the U.S. and Italian healthcare fraud, waste, and abuse laws.
Keep an eye out for Part 2 and Part 3 of this series that will be published in the December and January issues of Compliance Today.

Our Article on Clinical Trial Legislation Is Out

We are happy to announce that our article on “Drug Clinical Trials Legislation in the European Union” has been published on the Indian Journal of Law and Technology (https://www.ijlt.in/).

You may read it here or here.

The purpose of the article is to illustrate the basic tenets of European Union law on clinical trials. Such body of law has been progressively harmonized in the European Union over the years with the aim of subjecting interventional clinical trials conducted in any of the 27 European Union Member States to identical rules.

The article initially describes the reasons why clinical trials are important to measure the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of innovative medical treatment. It then continues by illustrating the scope and basic principles of the current EU Regulation, as well as its main changes over the previous legislation. Further, the article explains the requirements of the scientific and the ethical approvals of a clinical trial application. Lastly, the authors focus
on the patients’ consent to the enrollment in a clinical trial, as well as to the patients’ separate consent to the processing of their personal data

New Data Transfer Standard Contractual Clauses Approved by the EU Commission

On June 4, 2021 the EU Commission approved new standard contractual clauses (“SCC“), which are regarded to provide appropriate safeguards within the meaning of Article 46(1) and (2) (c) of the GDPR.

The new SCC are updated with GDPR, the opinions expressed during the course of the consultation phase (including those of the European Data Protection Board and the European Data Protection Supervisor), as well as take into account the recent Schrems II judgement of the Court of Justice.

There are two different sets of SCC: (i) for data transfers from controllers or processors in the EU/EEA (or otherwise subject to the GDPR) and (ii) to controllers or processors established outside the EU/EEA (and not subject to the GDPR).

The new SCC promisemore flexibility for complex processing chains, through a ‘modular approach’ and by offering the possibility for more than two parties to join and use the clauses“.

If you or your company are using the old SCC, you have a transition period of 18 months.

Patents on Covid Vaccines: the Plot Thickens

Last Friday I spoke at an interesting event, dedicated to lessons learned during the pandemic, sponsored by the association Women&Tech.

My plan was to illustrate the international aspects of intellectual property and, in particular, the possibilities afforded by article 31 of the TRIPS agreement to obtain a license to use vaccines’ patents without consent of the patent holder. There had also been a proposal by India and South Africa to waive IP rights on vaccines altogether, but it had been rejected. The discussion seemed largely theoretical.

Only a few hours before the event, the scenario completely changed when the US announced that it was backing the idea of a waiver of IP rights on Covid vaccines’ patents. Reactions by EU leaders were varied, and it is still unclear if the waiver proposal will receive the required three fourths of the votes at the WTO level.

You may find my slides (in Italian) below, but in my view the clearest explanation of the issues at stake is in the position paper by the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition, which can be found here.